How Do I Find My Google Ad?

Understanding Google ads and why you might not find yours where you expect to

I get it. You’ve invested money in Google ads (smart move!). And you see other people’s Google ads every time you browse the internet.

So how come you never see your own ad?

It’s a question we field from clients all the time. And there’s a simple answer.

But first, to put you at ease: don’t worry. There is nothing wrong if your Google ad is not showing your own personal search results.

In fact, this is often what you should expect.

We’ll cover Google ads and SEM (search engine marketing) in more detail below.

But first, we asked our resident ads expert Daniel Simmons to settle the question once and for all – why can’t you see your own Google Ads?

Understanding Google Ads (and why you don’t see your own)

Google ads can be uses to create brand awareness, but they’re often best used to sell or promote products or services, generate website traffic, or get email list signups. When used in this way, they offer an easy-to-measure ROI, so you can understand how your ads money is working for you.

Ultimately, budget plays a big factor in whether or not you’ll see your own ad. But first, let’s explore the two types of Google Ads – search ads and display ads – because the type of ads you’re using can factor into if and when you’ll see your them personally.

Search Ads

Like the name suggests, Search Ads are ads that appear when someone does a google search. Say you’re a plumber in Kelowna. If someone googles ‘plumber in Kelowna,’ then your ad could appear in their search results.

As you’d guess, these types of ads can be incredibly powerful, as you’re making sure you’re appearing front-and-centre to people who may be looking for your direct services.

The important thing to keep in mind, though, is that your ad won’t appear every single time someone searches for your keywords. You’re actually in a bidding war with every other company that’s using similar keywords (and trust us: the competition is often steep).

So if you have a small budget – say, less than $20/day – then it can get used up pretty quickly each day.

And that means that depending on when you try to find your ad, you might be searching after your ad spend for the day has been used up. In other words, it would be impossible for your ad to show up for you.

This is compounded by your geographic parameters. If you have a very specific location you’re targeting (as in, one small city), then maybe you’ll see your ads, even if you have a small budget.

But if you’re using a limited budget to target a huge area – like, all of North America, for example – then your budget will likely get used up before you have a chance to see your own ads on any given day.

It’s a numbers game. You don’t have to spend lots on Google Ads to get results, especially when you’re using smart SEM. But unless you’re spending lots in a very targeted region, the odds of seeing your own ad just aren’t there.

But don’t worry. Again, if your campaign is set up well, the right people will still be seeing and clicking. And that’s so much more important than stumbling on your own ad!

Display Ads

Display Ads work a little differently. These are images or video that show up on websites within a Display Network, and you pay per 1000 impressions.

There is a higher likelihood that you’ll see your own Display ads, assuming again your budget isn’t too small and your geographic targeting isn’t too large. But there’s a caveat. These ads don’t display on every website – only on specific ones within that network.

So, if you’re on the ‘wrong’ website, again, there’s a 0% chance your ad will show up.

Again, this isn’t the end of the world. Because again, just because you’re not seeing your ad, that doesn’t mean potential customers aren’t.

How to see your ad in search results

By now, you’re probably getting the picture. Unless you have a big budget (in the $100/day range or higher) and a small target region, then there’s a good chance you won’t see your ads.

And that’s ok.

Because not seeing your ad doesn’t mean it’s not performing well or getting you results.

READ: Best Ad Strategies for Immediate Results

Advertising can be so effective for your business, but it has to be done right or you’ll lose time and money. With all the info out there, conflicting advice and constantly-changing online platforms, it’s so hard to know where to spend your ad budget.

In this article, we’re simplifying both online and offline advertising strategies, so you can start to see immediate sales from your website.

Read More on our website.

So it’s much more important to see your ad results than to see your actual ads ‘in the wild.’ And you do that by checking your Google Analytics.

We make sure that all of our clients have access to their Google Analytics account. From that account, you can see where your ads are being shown, on what devices, at what times, and at what rates. There’s so much invaluable information you can find on your account.

That’s why Daniel is more than happy to spend time with clients to help them understand their Google Analytics accounts. Because sometimes all that invaluable information can lead to info overload. Many people log into their Analytics account once, find it overwhelming, and ‘nope’ out, never logging in again.

That’s why Daniel likes to take an hour or so with clients to walk them through how to understand what they’re seeing in Google Analytics.

Why?

“Just like you have to understand your financial numbers as a business owner,” he says, “you have to understand your website analytics. They go hand-in-hand in understanding your business and where it’s going.”

Of course, we also give our digital marketing clients monthly analytic reports as well.

Seeing your ad versus seeing results

Don’t fall into the trap of missing the forest for the trees.

Ultimately it doesn’t matter if you see your Google ad.

It matters if potential customers do. This is how Google ads help your business.

And that’s where an SEM expert like Daniel comes in.

SEM, or search engine marketing, helps increase conversations from paid Google Ads by leveraging proven campaign management and optimization strategies. It’s a critical tool in digital marketing. And it requires highly focused keywords to determine the most cost-effective approach to obtaining qualified customers who are searching for exactly what you offer.

Anyone can set up a Google account and get some ads running. Heck, you could probably set it up yourself.

Google Ads can dramatically improve your business – but only when you know how to use them.

But using Google ads properly, to connect with the right people at the right time with the right message, requires complex know-how. Without this know-how, you’re setting yourself up to waste a lot of money.

At eVision Media we will manage your Google AdWords account, targeting the keywords and display campaigns that will drive conversions (purchases, leads, goal completions) to your site.

Through a variety of research tools and techniques, we develop effective paid search campaigns focused on meeting your target cost per sale or lead. You’ll reach eager buyers who wouldn’t necessarily find you organically via search engine optimization techniques.

It’s also important to note to potential American clients that working with us can offer big savings. When we set up your Google Ads account, you’re able to pay Google in Canadian funds. And since you can pay us in Canadian funds, too, that can lead to big savings over time.

Tips on Keeping Your Audience Interested in Your Presentation

This might seem like a strange question to ask, but trust me, it’ll make sense in a bit. When did you last see a seat or bench that you hadn’t seen before, and yet know exactly how to use it? It could have been in a restaurant, or a bar, perhaps in someone’s office, or even in the park. Yet when you saw it, you knew exactly how to use it, right? Question is, how did you know? Still a serious question… The answer is a mix of things… You had seen ones like it before, your brain compared to previous experiences, you looked at how other people were using them and so on. So, with all of that happening in a thrice of a second, you didn’t even notice what was going on in your brain, and went ahead and sat down. Brilliant, itsnt it, how our brains can spot these patterns and act on them?

Now let’s compare that with something a little silly… What if you knew that ONE of the spaces to sit down was going to collapse, because it was being filmed, and the “hilarious” result would be broadcast on TV and the Internet. Wouldn’t that lead to some different behaviour on your part? Of course. A totally different pattern would likely see your brain playing a very full part in choosing where to sit. You would give it proper thought and attention.

Our brains get into patterns which is very useful a lot of the time. It saves time and thought by just letting us get on with things. But this same process happens all over the place, including in work situations. Which is why anything predictable… Like a work presentation, is liable to be experienced in the same auto pilot way as the seating example I just ran through. The answer then, to keeping our audience interested, is to find ways to interrupt these standard patterns.

This is about finding ways to be different when presenting. Not different for the sake of it, but different in order to prevent our audience fighting a losing battle with their own levels of attention. It is not about intentionally being wacky, crazy, humorous, funny or so on. We don’t desire to be provocative, or to cause offence, or upset, though any of these things may happen as a result of us seeking to be different. The reality is that a presentation with great content and a very standard style of delivery will get the same level of attention as a presentation with average content and an amazing interest generating style of delivery.

Look at most conferences and situations where there are a number of speakers and you will see one person after another doing the same things with pretty much the same lines over and over. Standard conference etiquette for example means that speakers use a podium or lectern, therefore speaking from the same spot, and a clearly defined structure makes it harder for any speaker to be noticed.

What we are looking at then is to identify patterns which often hold sway in presentations, and do something different. Remember, we don’t want to be different for the sake of it, we are looking to interrupt patterns to engage our audience and to demand their attention. This is a simple process to do, identify those habits many speakers have, just take note of what many speakers do, and look to do something differently. Here are a few points to start you off.

PowerPoint is one of the most common patterns that many speakers find themselves falling into, so the biggest interruption is to avoid using slides. When I say that to people they always go into a panic about how they can speak without slides, but if you can speak without slides, among a sea of other people using PowerPoint, you can certainly interrupt a strongly defined pattern.

Assuming you need to use slides for some reason, then consider your layout and design. Many conferences and organisations insist on a “house style” but this very style is putting you into a pattern.

A lectern forces you to remain in one spot… So when arranging your speech, ask for lapel microphones. This simple difference means that your audience can see you, and you can be yourself. Consider how other people are using space as they present, and if they are moving a lot, then consider standing still. Whatever patterns you see from other speakers, do something different.

Most speakers and conferences have a convention where they “open the floor to questions” at the end, so why not invite questions throughout? Think also about style within speaking, so look to take a contrary approach, which means use humour where others don’t, or challenge when others are more compliant and so on.

Finally do an audit of your personal presentation habits, and work hard to change them. Many habits are shared by speakers… So interrupt those patterns. Look out for people twizzling long hair, glasses off and on, ballpoint pen popping, phrases like “for those of you who don’t know me” and so on… It’s easy to see this as flippant and trivial details, but for those determined to gain and maintain their audiences attention, it’s essential that we find ways to interrupt our patterns. Good luck.

5 Tips For Dressing For Success While Presenting

“What should I wear when I present?” One of my coaching clients asked me this question recently. While it might sound more like a question for a style consultant, like my colleague Teresa Morisco on her Wardobe 911 blog, it’s also an appropriate question for a presentation skills coach like me.

In addition to your presentation content and delivery, how you dress and present yourself can affect the success of your presentation. Like your non-verbal communications, how you dress should support the message you are communicating and not distract from it. What you wear is particularly important in a high-stakes presentation, but it’s also important in any presentation, especially if it’s your first time speaking to this audience or you’re very nervous.

Here are 5 tips for dressing for success while presenting, no matter what the occasion:

1. Dress appropriately
What is considered appropriate depends on the audience and the venue. For example, if I’m performing improv comedy for entertainment at the monthly meeting of a women’s social club, I usually wear nice jeans. If I’m doing an improv workshop at a Fortune 500 company, however, I wear a business suit. If you’re not sure what is appropriate, ask the meeting planner or the person who invited you to speak. And if you’re not sure what looks good on you or what is age-appropriate, consult a style expert like Teresa or work with the personal shopping service at any major department store.

2. Dress comfortably
No, I’m not talking about wearing sweats or pajamas, but appropriate clothes that allow you to breathe and feel comfortable. For example, if you’re wearing high-heeled shoes that hurt your feet or pants with a tight waistband, you will not be focused on communicating your message. I have a client who feels very warm when she’s nervous – so I suggested she avoid heavy sweaters and instead, wear layers so she can remove a layer (like a jacket) if she’s feeling too warm.

3. Do a dress rehearsal
If your outfit is not something you’re used to wearing, practice wearing it while delivering your presentation. For example, if you normally wear khaki pants and a polo shirt, practice wearing the suit and tie so you’re not fidgeting with the tie or your shirt collar instead of focusing on your message.

4. Consider your props
If you’ll be wearing a lavaliere or clip-on microphone, plan ahead how you will wear it. Lavaliere microphones can be clipped easily on a tie or jacket lapel, but if you don’t have one of those, you have to figure out where else you can clip it. Also plan where you will put the microphone unit, especially if you don’t have a pocket or sturdy waistband.

5. Bring or wear something meaningful
Many of my clients find it helpful to have with them an item with special meaning. Especially if you’re nervous, having some kind of physical reminder of something special can help calm your nerves. For example, you could wear a necklace that your husband gave you, the watch you received when you got promoted or the ring you bought on your vacation to Hawaii. You could even keep something in your pocket, like a religious medal, or bring a special pen or business card case. Of course, you should not play with the item while speaking and it shouldn’t be distracting (no bracelets that clink loudly when you move your arm). The item is not a superstitious good luck charm, but a reminder of support and a boost of confidence.

When you do a final check in the mirror before you present, you should be able to smile at yourself and feel confident. If you follow these 5 tips, you and your audience will be able to focus on your presentation rather than being distracted by your clothes.